Tag Archives: non-fiction

what i’ve been reading in 2016

I thought it would be fun to try to capture the essence of each of the books I’ve read this year in as few words as possible.

  1. Extraordinary Means (fiction, by Robyn Schneider): medical ethics explored through young adult fiction in an alternate reality
  2. The Art of Hearing Heartbeats (fiction, by Jan-Philipp Sendker): transporting epic love story
  3. Food Rules: An Eater’s Manual (non-fiction, illustrated edition, by Michael Pollan): sensible eating with fun pictures
  4. The Beach House (fiction, by Mary Alice Monroe): mothers, daughters, turtles
  5. Made You Up (fiction, by Francesca Zappia): lovable mentally ill protagonist surviving  high school
  6. The Magicians (fiction, by Lev Grossman): Harry Potter meets Narnia, but more cynical and with some R-rated content
  7. A Man Called Ove (fiction, by Fredrik Backman): love and death, laughter and tears
  8. The Risk Pool (fiction, by Richard Russo): fathers, sons, small-town upstate New York
  9. Bewteen the World and Me (non-fiction, by Ta-Nehisi Coates): poetic description of life in a black body
  10. The Ocean at the End of the Lane (fiction, by Neil Gaiman): a spooky little fairy tale
  11. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks (non-fiction, by Rebecca Skloot): the woman whose cervical cells revolutionized biomedical research, unfortunately without informed consent
  12. Best Boy (fiction, by Eli Gottlieb): dramatic times at an assisted living center, from the perspective of a homesick autistic man
  13. The Forgotten Sister: Mary Bennet’s Pride and Prejudice (fiction, by Jennifer Paynter): the story of Mary, the Bennet sister that is left out of most of the action in Pride and Prejudice
  14. Americanah (fiction, by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie): an outspoken young Nigerian woman moves to the US (where she loves, blogs, and encounters racism), and years later, returns to Nigeria

Some books on deck for 2017 are Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg (by Irin Carmon and Shana Knizhnik), The Book Thief (by Markus Zusak), Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood (by Trevor Noah), All Joy and No Fun: The Paradox of Modern Parenthood (by Jennifer Senior), and My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She’s Sorry (by Fredrik Backman).

what i’ve been reading in 2015

I managed to read some books this year! Most of these were pretty light, but I would recommend them all.

  1. Twelve Years a Slave (by Solomon Northup). After all of the Oscar hoopla over this movie, I was interested in reading the book, though I still haven’t found time to watch the movie yet. I became especially interested in reading this book when I learned that it was a true story and Solomon was living in my hometown, Saratoga Springs, when he was captured. This book was a gripping account of human strength through all sorts of atrocities.
  2. Yes Please (by Amy Poehler). I was ready for a change of pace after Twelve Years a Slave, but stuck with the autobiographical format to read Yes Please. I love Amy Poehler, mostly from her work on the TV show Parks and Recreation. I didn’t love this book as much as Tina Fey’s or Mindy Kaling’s books, but I did enjoy reading it and still love Amy.
  3. Me Before You (by Jojo Moyes). Ready for a novel, I used Amazon’s suggestion for people who enjoyed Where’d You Go, Berenadette? (which I enjoyed immensely pre-motherhood) and found this popular and well-reviewed tear-jerker. It apparently has at least one sequel, but I don’t know if I want to spend more time crying in my office during my lunch break.
  4. Big Little Lies (by Liane Moriarty). A funny page-turner of a mystery novel, told with various narrators.
  5. I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban (by Malala Yousafzai). Malala Yousafzai is such an inspiration, and now she is also the youngest ever Nobel Peace Prize winner as she works tirelessly for education for all girls around the world. The book takes a little while to gain momentum, but is definitely worth the effort. Malala spends a lot of time introducing the reader to her family and cultural history, which is maybe not quite as engaging as her personal story, but important to understand in terms of how the Taliban came to power in Pakistan. Stick with it and become a Malala superfan like me. I am very excited to see the documentary He Named Me Malala when I have some time.
  6. The Royal We (by Heather Cocks and Jessica Morgan). I’ve been reading Heather and Jessica’s witty fashion blog, Go Fug Yourself, for many years, so of course I was excited to read their novel. I only have a passing interest in the British royal family that this novel is loosely inspired by, but this is a fun story that is full of engaging characters. It was a great airplane read!
  7. The Rosie Project (by Graeme Simsion). I love a quirky narrator, and this book’s narrator and protagonist is a great one. Don Tillman is an eccentric genetics professor who has begun “The Wife Project,” a quantitative search for a partner to share his life with, and hilarity ensues.
  8. The Rosie Effect (by Graeme Simsion). The sequel to The Rosie Project is not quite as funny and touching as the initial book, but it was an enjoyable and quick read.

I got some new books that I am looking forward to reading over Christmas vacation and beyond. They are Extraordinary Means (by Robyn Schneider), Made You Up (by Francesca Zappia), The Beach House (by Mary Alice Monroe), The Art of Hearing Heartbeats (by Jan-Philipp Sendker), and The Magicians (by Lev Grossman).

Have you read any good books lately?

good books

I’ve read quite a few good books lately, so I thought I’d share some mini reviews of them:

The Count of Monte Cristo, by Alexandre Dumas. The translation I read was a bit abridged (the Barnes and Noble Classics edition),  but this 634-page edition still contained more than enough plot for this reader. It’s a brilliant story.

Bossypants, by Tina Fey. I love her. A fun and quick read.

The Eyre Affair, Lost in a Good Book, The Well of Lost Plots, all by Jasper Fforde. I got sucked into the Thursday Next series, which is a delightful mixture of detective/adventure/fantasy targeted at literature geeks.

What’s Bred in the Bone, by Robertson Davies. A novel about the life of a Canadian artist/spy during the late 19th century and well into the 20th century, with an emphasis on factors that shaped his character and fate. Lots of great supporting characters.

The Hunger Games, by Suzanne Collins. For me, this popular novel is Margaret Atwood’s dark visions of our future society meets young adult fiction featuring a teenage female protagonist caught in a love triangle (though composed of more functional relationships than in Twilight). Although the plot is driven by the horrific spectacle of children forced to fight to the death, compassion and decency are at the true heart of the story.

Currently reading: Catching Fire, by Suzanne Collins

On deck: Mockingjay, by Suzanne Collins, and Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? (and Other Concerns), by Mindy Kaling

What have you been reading lately?

obsession of the week: colonoscopy

This post may verge into TMI land for some readers, but I’ve found other people’s personal accounts of inflammatory bowel disease-related experiences helpful and sometimes comforting, so I am sharing mine here.

my colonoscopy prep supplies!

If you’re lucky, you won’t have to worry about your first colonoscopy until you’re in your 50s or 60s and need to start getting screened for colon cancer every five to ten years. But Crohns-y me had my first this week, and I can look forward to many many more over the coming years.

Continue reading →

marching powder

I just finished reading a great book, Marching Powder, by Rusty Young and Thomas McFadden. This book is a memoir of Thomas McFadden’s experiences as a prisoner in San Pedro prison in La Paz, Bolivia. There were good times and very very bad times in the prison and I was surprised and entertained by the many hats that Thomas wore as a prisoner: Thomas the tour guide, Thomas the shopkeeper, Thomas the restauranteur, and Father Thomas, to name a few. This engaging page-turner shares the friendships, corruption, drugs, and humor that shaped one prisoner’s life.

the state of africa

I just finished reading The State of Africa, by Martin Meredith, over the weekend. I’m glad I read this book, because now I at least have some understanding of how most of Africa got to be in the dire situation it currently is in. But, this book was the most tragic and depressing thing I have ever read. I’m normally a pretty quick reader, but it took me over three months to read this 600+ page book. The number one reason for my slowness? A person can only take in so much tragedy in one sitting. And topics like genocide, child soldiers, and AIDS don’t make for very good before-bed reading. I was incredibly disappointed, over and over again, with the African leadership. I feel so badly for the people of Africa, because most of them just want a peaceful life and the means to be healthy and happy, but their leaders are working against them. Almost all of Africa’s leaders can be described as greedy, corrupt, and selfish and ruthless to the extreme. Nelson Mandela provided the only true ray of light and hope in the 50 years or so of African history that the book covered. South Africa was very lucky to have such a magnanimous leader.

As an aside, The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind, by William Kamkwamba (with Bryan Mealer), was a great book that prompted my acute interest in African history. It’s an inspirational autobiography by a Malawian teenager who developed windmill-generated electricity for his family by reading at the library, picking up useful pieces of junk around his village, and his own cleverness and hard work.